Adopt in Norway

In Norway adoption by same-sex couples has been legal since 2009 and stepparent adoption has been legal since 2002.
Lesbian couples can access artificial insemination techniques. In these cases, both mothers are recognized from the moment of conception (read more).

The Adoption Act

Chapter 1. Conditions for adoption, etc.

Section 2. 

An adoption order must only be issued when it can be assumed that the adoption will be in the best interests of the child. It is further required that the person applying for an adoption either wishes to foster or has fostered the

child,

or that there is another special reason for the adoption. 

Section 3. 

An adoption order may only be issued to a person who has reached 25 years of age. However, when there are strong reasons for doing so, the Ministry may issue an order to a person who has reached 20 years of age. 

An order allowing a parent to adopt his or her biological child may only be issued if such adoption will be of significance for the child’s legal status, or in the case of a new adoption of a child who has been adopted. 

Section 3 a.

In connection with the processing of an application for adoption, the Ministry shall require the presentation of an exhaustive criminal record certificate. 

Section 4. 

A person who has been declared incapable of managing his or her own affairs may only adopt with the consent of his or her guardian. 

Section 5. 

A person who is married or is a cohabitant may only adopt jointly with his or her spouse or

cohabitant,

unless the spouse or cohabitant is insane or mentally retarded or is missing. 

Persons other than spouses or cohabitants may not adopt jointly. 

Section 5 a.  

For the purposes of this Act, the term “cohabitants” means two persons who live together in a stable, marriage-like relationship. 

Section 5 b.

One of the spouses or cohabitants may, with the consent of the other spouse or cohabitant, adopt the latter’s child unless they are spouses or cohabitants of the same sex and the child is an adopted child originating from a foreign state that does not permit such adoption. 

One of the partners in a registered partnership may, with the consent of the other partner, adopt the latter’s child unless the child is an adopted child originating from a foreign state that does not permit such adoption. 

A divorced spouse or registered partner may, with the consent of the former spouse or registered partner, adopt the latter’s child. This only applies where one parenthood relationship has been established for the child, and this parent is divorced from the person who is applying for adoption. A corresponding right applies to cohabitants when the cohabitation relationship has been dissolved. 

A surviving spouse, registered partner or cohabitant may adopt a child of his or her former spouse, registered partner or cohabitant. This only applies when one parenthood relationship has been established for the child, and this parent is deceased. 

Section 6. 

A child who has reached 7 years of age, and younger children who are capable of forming their own opinions, shall be informed and given an opportunity to express their view before a decision is made as to whether an adoption order is to be issued. The opinion of the child is to be given due weight in accordance with the age and maturity of the child. 

A child who has reached 12 years of age may not be adopted without his or her consent. 

When requested, the municipality shall assist the authority responsible for issuing the adoption order in obtaining information regarding the case pursuant to the first paragraph and in obtaining consent pursuant to the second paragraph. 

Section 7.

A person under 18 years of age may not be adopted without the consent of the person or persons who have parental responsibility. If one of them is missing, insane or mentally retarded, the consent of the other is sufficient. If both persons are missing, insane or mentally retarded, the consent of the guardian is required. 

The parents may not give their consent until two months after the birth of the child. 

A father or mother who does not share parental responsibility shall, as far as possible, be given the opportunity to express an opinion before a decision is made. If a person other than the father or mother has been appointed guardian of the person who is to be adopted, the guardian shall also be permitted to give his opinion. “